We Are What We Say

Be Mindful

gaywrites:

"When I announced my intention to counter-protest on Reddit, the majority were against it as an act of enablement, giving them what they want. Most played the ‘simply ignore them and they’ll go away’ card. I disagree.

"If uncontested, they are still seeding their influence of hate on the world. If they seduce just one idiot in a car passing by, I consider this to be unacceptable. Rather I chose to mock and invalidate them, not because I felt that it would change their minds, or even change the mind of the guy who drives by and sympathizes. I did it to neutralize them. If a car drives by with a bullied youth in it, I want him to see that there are people who are fighting for him. I want him to know that the world isn’t just going to sit by while he is demonized. I want him to take solace in the fact that good still outweighs the bad.”

How Orlando Trolled the Westboro Baptist Church (via Berserkpixie on Imgur)

For, like almost everyone else in our country, I started out with my share of optimism. I believed in hard work and progress and action, but now, after first being ‘for’ society and then ‘against’ it, I assign myself no rank or any limit, and such an attitude is very much against the trend of the times. But my world has become one of infinite possibilities. What a phrase - still it’s a good phrase and a good view of life, and a man shouldn’t accept any other; that much I’ve learned underground.

—Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (via hoomanao)

inothernews:

DON’T COP   An Occupy London protester offers a flower to a police officer to mark May Day.  In the U.S., demonstrations, strikes and acts of civil disobedience were planned Tuesday, including what could be the country’s most high-profile Occupy rallies since the anti-Wall Street encampments came down in the fall.  (Photo: Lefteris Pitarakis / AP via MSNBC)

inothernews:

DON’T COP   An Occupy London protester offers a flower to a police officer to mark May Day.  In the U.S., demonstrations, strikes and acts of civil disobedience were planned Tuesday, including what could be the country’s most high-profile Occupy rallies since the anti-Wall Street encampments came down in the fall.  (Photo: Lefteris Pitarakis / AP via MSNBC)

theworldofchinese:

THE CHINA BRAIN DRAIN
Environmental issues in China are scaring away foreign employees from multinational companies and putting the country’s economic development at risk. According to a recent report, China’s air quality has been listed among the major reasons for managerial shortages in multinational companies in China. The latest survey conducted by the American Chamber of Commerce in China revealed that 48 percent of companies, compared with 34 percent last year, considered air pollution to be an obstacle to recruiting and training senior executives. Furthermore, according to the 2014 Business Climate Survey, 36 percent of the respondents, compared with 30 percent last year, claimed a shortage of qualified members to be a risk factor to their financial operations in China.
The report said:

“The air quality concerns may be an increasingly important factor. Finding and keeping employees, particularly managers, is a major challenge for foreign companies. This leads to an inevitable growth in labor costs, (which is) not only a major risk to companies’ operations, but also to the competitiveness of China as a whole.”

Increasing costs also pose challenges for top businesses, followed by inconsistent regulatory interpretation, unclear laws, and a shortage of qualified employees.
With more than 30 years of a huge economic transition underway, China is now facing the problem of how to sustain its economic miracle and fill job positions with qualified workers. And yes, this is something to worry about. China’s population is also aging rapidly due to the one-child policy, although this policy is set to be finally changed. Migrant workers who have been working for a pittance are now demanding better payment. The workers’ strikes occurring in China in recent years have included Toyota and Honda in southern China, a taxi drivers’ strike in Chongqing, strikes by workers at a major BMW distributor, and a strike in southern China, this year, involving more than 1,000 workers at an IBM factory.
New college graduates struggling to find jobs after graduation further complicates the picture. According to a 2013 report, around seven million students graduated from Chinese universities last year. This number shows an increase of 190,000 students compared with 2012 figures. Employers are in no hurry to offer jobs to new graduates. Official media outlets report that job vacancies for graduates in Beijing, for example, are at 98,000, which is a 14 percent decrease year-on-year. Such figures demonstrate a slowdown in potential economic growth.
Moreover, emigration to Western countries such as the US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand is still a priority for the Chinese elite. The brain drain issue is a problem the country needs to find a solution to as citizens with wealth and skills are increasingly moving abroad. According to a report made by the Centre for China and Globalization (CCG) and reported in the South China Morning Post, the figure for Chinese emigrating reached 9.34 million last year, choosing the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand as their preferences, while only a total of 848,000 foreigners have migrated into China…
Continue Reading Here.

theworldofchinese:

THE CHINA BRAIN DRAIN

Environmental issues in China are scaring away foreign employees from multinational companies and putting the country’s economic development at risk. According to a recent report, China’s air quality has been listed among the major reasons for managerial shortages in multinational companies in China. The latest survey conducted by the American Chamber of Commerce in China revealed that 48 percent of companies, compared with 34 percent last year, considered air pollution to be an obstacle to recruiting and training senior executives. Furthermore, according to the 2014 Business Climate Survey, 36 percent of the respondents, compared with 30 percent last year, claimed a shortage of qualified members to be a risk factor to their financial operations in China.

The report said:

“The air quality concerns may be an increasingly important factor. Finding and keeping employees, particularly managers, is a major challenge for foreign companies. This leads to an inevitable growth in labor costs, (which is) not only a major risk to companies’ operations, but also to the competitiveness of China as a whole.”

Increasing costs also pose challenges for top businesses, followed by inconsistent regulatory interpretation, unclear laws, and a shortage of qualified employees.

With more than 30 years of a huge economic transition underway, China is now facing the problem of how to sustain its economic miracle and fill job positions with qualified workers. And yes, this is something to worry about. China’s population is also aging rapidly due to the one-child policy, although this policy is set to be finally changed. Migrant workers who have been working for a pittance are now demanding better payment. The workers’ strikes occurring in China in recent years have included Toyota and Honda in southern China, a taxi drivers’ strike in Chongqing, strikes by workers at a major BMW distributor, and a strike in southern China, this year, involving more than 1,000 workers at an IBM factory.

New college graduates struggling to find jobs after graduation further complicates the picture. According to a 2013 report, around seven million students graduated from Chinese universities last year. This number shows an increase of 190,000 students compared with 2012 figures. Employers are in no hurry to offer jobs to new graduates. Official media outlets report that job vacancies for graduates in Beijing, for example, are at 98,000, which is a 14 percent decrease year-on-year. Such figures demonstrate a slowdown in potential economic growth.

Moreover, emigration to Western countries such as the US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand is still a priority for the Chinese elite. The brain drain issue is a problem the country needs to find a solution to as citizens with wealth and skills are increasingly moving abroad. According to a report made by the Centre for China and Globalization (CCG) and reported in the South China Morning Post, the figure for Chinese emigrating reached 9.34 million last year, choosing the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand as their preferences, while only a total of 848,000 foreigners have migrated into China…

Continue Reading Here.

(via twistedlandstourguide)

  • Wow! I highly encourage you all to hike out to some place where Humans are few and force upon the world a PRIMAL SCREAM.
  • I knew I've needed it for a good while. And true, I could also use a good cry. (Damn these repressed emotions!).
  • I yelled out phrases like: "fuck society's expectations", and "get spayed/neuter yourself", and -my favourite- "let us have quality of life".
  • My throat is sore now, and and I love it.